Zyscovich Architects

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We make people places.

Lincoln Cinema & Retail Complex

Miami Beach, FL

The design of the Lincoln Cinema, the first movie theater built on Miami Beach in over 40 years, is a deliberate departure from the generic American multi-screen complex. Honoring its urban setting, Zyscovich Architects determined that the show begins on the street with a tilting wall of colored glass panels that are backlit after dark. Conceptually, glass was applied for its connotations of modernity—of the way it represents openness, lightness, technical innovation, and progressiveness—hallmarks of the era out of which Lincoln Road was born in the 1930’s and of the present moment in architecture. Glass also is used to turn the theater inside out, its transparency drawing the energy of the street life within and exhibiting the excitement of interior congregation to the outside.

The project also includes 35,000 SF of retail and restaurant space and a 287-car parking garage which was designed specifically to bring visitors out onto the sidewalk and into the urban experience, rather than directly into the theater.

 

The design of the Lincoln Cinema, the first movie theater built on Miami Beach in over 40 years, is a deliberate departure from the generic American multi-screen complex. Honoring its urban setting, Zyscovich Architects determined that the show begins on the street with a tilting wall of colored glass panels that are backlit after dark. Conceptually, glass was applied for its connotations of modernity—of the way it represents openness, lightness, technical innovation, and progressiveness—hallmarks of the era out of which Lincoln Road was born in the 1930’s and of the present moment in architecture. Glass also is used to turn the theater inside out, its transparency drawing the energy of the street life within and exhibiting the excitement of interior congregation to the outside.

The project also includes 35,000 SF of retail and restaurant space and a 287-car parking garage which was designed specifically to bring visitors out onto the sidewalk and into the urban experience, rather than directly into the theater.