Zyscovich Architects

EnglishEspañol

Hacemos los lugares de la gente.

Anchor Shops & Parking Garage

Miami Beach, FL

For fifty years, pedestrian access, traffic circulation, and views to the beach were interrupted at 16th Street between Washington and Collins Avenue by an underused municipal parking lot and two historic buildings. Located in the Convention Hotel District, City planners had identified the three-block-long site for potential development. In 1996, the Miami Beach Redevelopment Agency and Loews Hotel Corporation entered into a public-private joint venture to build the first convention-quality resort hotel in Miami Beach in more than three decades. The Anchor Shops and Parking Garage proved integral to the Hotel Development Agreement by enabling the Loews Hotel to meet its parking requirement as specified under the City’s zoning ordinance.

The firm conceived of a means of providing the necessary parking spaces within 500 feet of the hotel, as required by the City’s zoning code, in a way that both practically and handsomely served the urban setting. By reopening 16th Street as a roadway, incorporating the historic buildings into a new structure, and building 21,500 SF of retail space at ground level, the design provided a safe, secure, and easily maintainable parking facility without the visual and physical intrusion of a massive parking pedestal.

The parking structure is conceived as an urban building with pedestrian oriented activities at the street. The building is designed to blend into the character of the historic district and is clad with a combination of architectural pre-cast, for the garage component which is set back from the street, and stucco at the retail level at the sidewalk. The structure itself is a precast structure with field or factory applied topping slabs. The facility is highly sensitive to issues of security, nighttime use, maintainability and ease of operation. The 800 car garage services both the hotel and the general public. The resulting development restored pedestrian and traffic circulation and also revived the only derelict municipal site in the City’s Historic District.

 

PHOTOGRAPHY (C) STEVEN BROOKE STUDIOS

For fifty years, pedestrian access, traffic circulation, and views to the beach were interrupted at 16th Street between Washington and Collins Avenue by an underused municipal parking lot and two historic buildings. Located in the Convention Hotel District, City planners had identified the three-block-long site for potential development. In 1996, the Miami Beach Redevelopment Agency and Loews Hotel Corporation entered into a public-private joint venture to build the first convention-quality resort hotel in Miami Beach in more than three decades. The Anchor Shops and Parking Garage proved integral to the Hotel Development Agreement by enabling the Loews Hotel to meet its parking requirement as specified under the City’s zoning ordinance.

The firm conceived of a means of providing the necessary parking spaces within 500 feet of the hotel, as required by the City’s zoning code, in a way that both practically and handsomely served the urban setting. By reopening 16th Street as a roadway, incorporating the historic buildings into a new structure, and building 21,500 SF of retail space at ground level, the design provided a safe, secure, and easily maintainable parking facility without the visual and physical intrusion of a massive parking pedestal.

The parking structure is conceived as an urban building with pedestrian oriented activities at the street. The building is designed to blend into the character of the historic district and is clad with a combination of architectural pre-cast, for the garage component which is set back from the street, and stucco at the retail level at the sidewalk. The structure itself is a precast structure with field or factory applied topping slabs. The facility is highly sensitive to issues of security, nighttime use, maintainability and ease of operation. The 800 car garage services both the hotel and the general public. The resulting development restored pedestrian and traffic circulation and also revived the only derelict municipal site in the City’s Historic District.

 

PHOTOGRAPHY (C) STEVEN BROOKE STUDIOS